George H.W. Bush

220px-George_H._W._Bush_cropCondolences to the Bush family at their second loss this year. I believe the reputation of the forty first President of the United States will only be enhanced with the passage of time. RIP President George Bush Sr 1924 – 2018.

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One hundred years ago

poppyAnd so a hundred years ago, at the eleventh hour, of the eleventh day, of the eleventh month, the war that was to end all wars came to an end. For those of that generation it came to be called the Great War but an even greater more destructive one would come to be in the next generation. World War One would be followed by World War Two and lesser wars would continue to be unto our own times.

We give pause, at this time, and on this day each year

to remember those who served,

those who sacrificed,

and those who paid the final price.

Kids at play

uscapitalHere they go with judicial nominations again. Not a single statesmen among the lot of them just a bunch of politicians doing what they do best in Washington DC.

As I posted earlier have 5 set days on which the nomination is brought to a confirmation vote; 20 days after, 40 days, 60 days, 90 days, and 120 days. It is automatically brought to a vote the first sitting of the Senate 60 days after the nomination. The Senate by 75 votes can bring it to a vote 20 days after the nomination, by 67 votes 40 days after, by 34 votes 90 days after, and by 50 votes delay the confirmation vote till 120 days after appointment. Super majorities can bring a nomination forward in time and minorities can delay the confirmation vote. Majorities can not suppress the minority and the minorities can not block the majority. The Senate has every right to confirm and every right to reject but no right to do this routine they do for everything now. Congress has become not just dysfunctional but almost inoperable.

I would change the vote needed to confirm judicial appointments. For the lower courts and appeal courts a 2/3 majority of those senators present and voting with at least 51 senators voting. For all Supreme court appointments an absolute 2/3 majority or 67 votes for confirmation.